resume, cover letter, screening, job, career, Laine Bodnar, Laine Jaremey, Pencil Skirts & Punctuation

The secret things resume screeners look for

Searching for a job is a job in itself! We put hours into our resumes. We often think that this effort won’t go to waste, as many of us assume that the person who reviews our resume will spend lots of time doing so. However, a study of the people who screen resumes revealed that they do so for only six seconds on average.

Yes, I said six seconds. To put that in perspective, it probably took you nearly 25 seconds to read the first paragraph of this blog post.

So, how do you get a person who reviews resumes, also called a resume screener, to take a longer look and consider you for the job?

Understanding the information that a resume screener is looking for, and providing them with it in an efficient manner, is critical.

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Focus on key areas of your resume

There are four key parts of your resume that resume screeners hone-in on to check if you’re a good fit for the job. These sections, and things to think about as you prepare them, are below:

  1. Work objective or career summary – In the interest of space, you may only include one of these sections at the top of your resume. Here you can highlight the value that you can bring to the organization right off the bat. Review the job description to understand key words and make sure they’re present here too.
  2. Relevant skills and qualifications – Are your skills and qualifications tailored to the job you’re applying for?
  3. Employment history – Have you demonstrated an upward trajectory in past roles with promotions at the same company, or when moving from one company to another? Are the jobs relevant to the position you’re applying for? Are there gaps in your employment history that you should proactively explain?
  4. Industry experience – Are your previous jobs in the same industry as the company that you’re applying to work at? If not, demonstrate how you’ve gained knowledge of the industry, and showcase transferable skills. 

Attention to detail matters too

If the role you’re applying for requires attention to detail and accuracy – and let’s face it, most jobs do! – you must review your resume with a fine-tooth comb. Common red flags for resume screeners include:

  • Incorrect company name or job title – Yes, this sounds obvious. But if you’re applying for more than one job, or if you’ve older versions of your resume, it can be easy to accidentally submit a document with incorrect information in these fields.
  • Errors – Typos and grammatical errors are prime examples. Factual errors, like discrepancies in past job titles between your resume and cover letter, or incorrect dates of previous employment, should also be avoided. Consider asking a trusted friend or family member, or a third-party resume/career services consultant, to proofread your documents to reduce errors.
  • Skimping on your accomplishments – Connect the dots for the screener by clearly stating your achievements in previous roles and make a positive impression early in the hiring process. This can be done in both your cover letter and resume, but don’t be too repetitive between the two.

Job candidates should also know that some companies use software, not people, to vet resumes as they are received. Learn more about how this software examines resumes here.

What other tips do you have for catching the attention of resume screeners? Share in the comments.

Image credits: Pixabay.com.

Resume, cover letter, job interview, career, public relations, project management, Pencil Skirts & Punctuation, Laine Jaremey

3 things not to say in a job interview

Picture yourself at a job interview.

You might be seated across from a hiring manager in a boardroom, or sitting with your potential new boss in their office. You’re wearing your favourite interview-appropriate outfit. You’ve prepared for the interview based on tips from recruiters. You answer the interviewer’s questions and clearly, concisely and convincingly share information about yourself, your capabilities and your accomplishments. You convey why you’d be an awesome fit for both the role and the organization.

Resume, cover letter, job interview, career, public relations, project management, Pencil Skirts & Punctuation, Laine Jaremey

But keep in mind that while you’re in this interview, there could be a few things that you want to know about the job, or that are motivating you to apply for it, which you should keep to yourself. Otherwise, you could risk tarnishing your image with the interviewer, or risk your likelihood of being hired.

Here are three things to never ask about or say in a job interview:

  1. Don’t say the job you’re interviewing for is a stepping stone to another job. Think about if you were dating someone and they told you they were waiting for someone better to come along – you’d feel pretty bad. That’s how a potential employer would take it too.
  2. Don’t complain about your past employer. It can indicate that you’re immature or unable to build professional relationships.
  3. Don’t ask about vacation time. You may seem like you’re already eager to step away from the role and your responsibilities. You’ll learn about (and maybe even be able to negotiate) vacation time if you receive a job offer.

Can you think of any other things to avoid saying in an interview? Share in the comments.

Image credits: Pixabay.com.

Resume, cover letter, job interview, career, public relations, project management, Pencil Skirts & Punctuation, Laine Jaremey

Getting an “A” in study habits 101

It’s been years since I’ve needed to crack open a textbook, make notes, study and write a test. Not since completing my undergraduate degree and post-graduate certificate years ago have I needed to review, digest and apply a course-load of information and then demonstrate mastery of it during one written exam.

This is unfortunate, because right now, I’m preparing to study for and take an exam. Gulp.

Which exam? The Project Management Professional, or PMP certification exam. As a communications professional, this certification will complement and enhance the work I do. To make sure communications and PR campaigns are successful, managing the moving pieces and making sure everything is being done on-time, on-budget and high-quality is critical – this is where effective project management comes in. Plus, I’m a huge fan of professional development!

So, I’m first brushing up on my study skills. Here are some tips that I’m going to keep in mind as I embark on this exam preparation journey:

  • How I study matters as much as what I study. Science proves it! Edudemic.com reports that some study habits are proven by science, such as regularly exercising, not rushing through course material, switching up studying locations and topics, getting good rest, and taking a tech break.

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  • Setting a studying schedule will help me to map out key milestones in my exam preparation. This is particularly important because I’m doing self-directed learning and there’s no one to make sure I’m on track. Using a critical path (there’s more about creating a critical path and other planning tools in an older post here), I’ll keep myself accountable and organized, ensuring that all important content is covered.
  • In my university days, mnemonic devices were helpful for remembering detailed information, like lists or theories, when cramming for a test. They’re great for everyday things too! But, sometimes I find that creating the mnemonic device seems like as much work as actually remembering the thing it stands for! A digital mnemonic generator will make life easier (I wish these were around when I was in school!). Since there are many lists of processes and components to remember, this tool will be helpful in my exam PMP prep.
  • Quiz yo’ self! Testing my knowledge before the exam can help me assess just how much I’ve retained from studying. I’ll try making flash cards, doing practice exams, or explaining key concepts to someone else to assess my understanding.

What are your favourite study tactics? Share your tips in the comments!

Image credits: Pixabay.com.